Tag Archives: outdoors

Photographing Moose In Algonquin Park

Last week I made the 3 hour drive from my home near Westport, Ontario up to Algonquin Park. The park is part of the Ontario provincial park system and is often referred to as the ‘jewel of Ontario’. And a jewel it is. Despite being only a few hour drive from two of Ontario’s biggest cities, Toronto and Ottawa, the park is brimming with wildlife. Bear, Eastern Wolf, Fox, White-tailed Deer, Beaver, Pine Marten and a whole host of other animals are abundant in the park. As with most wildlife, a glimpse of some of these may be rare because many of these animals are secretive and avoid humans. But for the persistent who are willing to get out on the trails in the early morning, you may be treated to some great wildlife viewing.

Algonquin Park has many ponds, lakes, marshes and bogs, making it an ideal place for moose.

Algonquin Park has many ponds, lakes, marshes and bogs, making it an ideal place for moose.

One of the things Algonquin is known for is its moose. The many bogs and marshes within its boundaries provide ample habitat for a healthy moose population. Spring and fall are the best times to visit the park to see moose. Ā So I packed my camera gear in my little Toyota Yaris and headed for the park. This trip was to be a brief one – less than 48 hours for a round trip – but I had high hopes for making some great moose photos.

Moose love to graze on sodium-rich aquatic plants, which provide much-needed salt in their diet.

Moose love to graze on sodium-rich aquatic plants, which provide much-needed salt in their diet.

I wasn’t disappointed. I went into the park for a few hours in the evening and saw one moose, a young bull happily grazing at the side of the road on some lush grass. He didn’t seem bothered by my presence and so I had time to get a few good shots until someone else pulled up in their truck and rather than hanging back quietly to rattle off some frames, decided to walk toward the moose to get a closer shot. That’s never a good idea with moose – some are pretty mellow, but some aren’t and so you need to keep your distance. You certainly wouldn’t be doing what this guy did, during the fall rut when males are charged full of hormones and out searching for females to mate with.

With lots of marshes along Hwy 60, there's lots of moose habitat right along the main road.

With lots of marshes along Hwy 60, there’s lots of moose habitat right along the main road.

It was starting to get a bit too dark for good photos, so I headed back to my motel room for a good nights sleep and an early return to the park the next morning. I arrived at the park to buy my day permit at 5:45 am. It was light by then, but not bright, so still a bit challenging in terms of light levels for my 600 mm lens. I shoot with a Nikon D200, which I love. But the D200 has old technology and so I don’t shoot about ISO 320 because of the graininess of images at higher ISO’s.

As the sun gets low in the sky, lighting conditions become more challenging, especially when shooting with a long lens. But with many moose happy to pose for your images, you don't have to worry about fast shutter speeds.

As the sun gets low in the sky, lighting conditions become more challenging, especially when shooting with a long lens. But with many moose happy to pose for your images, you don’t have to worry about fast shutter speeds.

The southern park corridor, where I was on this trip, consists of a paved highway (Hwy 60) that runs roughly 55 km east-west along the southern border of the park. It is the most developed part of the park, with visitors centres, museums and a number of car-camping campgrounds. But in May, before the kids are out of school and families on vacation, the park is wonderfully quiet. And so the best way to spot moose is to drive along Hwy 60, early in the morning. The moose come out of the forest to graze on maple saplings and lush grass at the side of the road or to munch on aquatic plants in one of the many marshes and bogs.

You'll often find moose just off the road, in the forest, browsing on maple saplings.

You’ll often find moose just off the road, in the forest, browsing on maple saplings.

Within a 5 minute drive of the east gate where I purchased my day permit, I spotted a moose grazing at the side of the road. I quietly pulled over, set my tripod and lens up on my side of the road and happily rattled off frames while the young bull grazed, not minding my presence. He was on the other side of the road, eating aquatic plants in a marshy area. I didn’t approach him for a closer look. That would be stupid. Plus, with my 600 mm lens, I didn’t need to get closer. In fact, the only images I could get of this moose were head shots. Yes, being that close with a long lens means you can’t even get a full body shot. Not that I’m complaining at all. šŸ™‚ No way! I’d dreamed of getting these kinds of images for years. But you wouldn’t even need a 600 mm lens to get great shots. A 200 mm with a teleconverter or a 400 mm lens would be plenty to make great images at this distance.

A 600 mm lens is great for wildlife portraits. You can see that this female has antlers that are just starting to grow back (they shed them each year in the fall) and she is  looking scruffy, with her thick winter coat being shed and her sleek, dark summer coat coming in underneath.

A 600 mm lens is great for wildlife portraits. You can see that this female has antlers that are just starting to grow back (they shed them each year in the fall) and she is looking scruffy, with her thick winter coat being shed and her sleek, dark summer coat coming in underneath.

I shot several images of this moose and then piled my photo gear back in my car to head on down Hwy 60. One minute later, another moose. So I got out, quietly set up my tripod and Ā rattled off more frames. Once I was happy with what I had gotten, I headed off down the road again. Not even one minute later, two more moose – this time a mother and what looked like last year’s calf, an older one, not a newborn. I didn’t get any photos of them. Mum was just too wary with her calf by her side and she slowly led her calf back into the forest. Getting great images is so satisfying, but no image, regardless of how amazing it is, is ever worth disturbing wildlife. Wildlife photography needs to be ethical, meaning the well-being of the wildlife comes first. Period. No image is worth harassing wildlife. And so when Mum and calf wandered off into the forest, I didn’t pursue them. They clearly didn’t want to be bothered. So the best thing to do in these cases is to enjoy the fleeting moment you had with these beautiful animals and then continue on down the road in search of others.

No shortage of moose portraits using my Nikon 600 mm telephoto lens.

No shortage of moose portraits using my Nikon 600 mm telephoto lens.

Another minute down the road, another moose. Wow! This was incredible! And my good luck continued. Inside of 10 minutes, I spotted 5 moose! In fact, in my very short time in the park, in less than 48 hours, I saw 11 moose. I photographed 5 of them. The rest were either fleeting glimpses or cases where the animal was partially hidden by the forest. But oh, these sightings were fantastic. Moose are remarkable animals. They are BIG. I was seeing mostly young males and females rather than full-grown adults. But these guys are still big. And they are gangly-looking, with their long, spindly legs, robust body, big ears and long face. And the males have a waddle, a fleshy bit of skin that hangs under the chin, which makes them look all the more bizarre.

Moose are funny looking animals, almost cartoonish. But they are also magnificent symbols of the wilderness.

Moose are funny looking animals, almost cartoonish. But they are also magnificent symbols of the wilderness.

By 10am, the sun was high in the sky, the temperature and humidity soaring and the moose scarce. This is the best time to head to one of the many hiking trails for a walk. I did two hikes – one to a lookout. It was a steep walk up that got the heart working hard, but the view at the top was well worth the effort. The other hike I did was the first few kilometres of the Mizzy Lake Trail. Typically it’s a 6 hour hike and I didn’t have 6 hours, so I just did the first few kms. And that was plenty, given that I was lugging around my 600 mm lens, my tripod, and a few other lenses. Although I didn’t see moose on the trail, I did see many tracks. This is a good trail to go to early in the morning when the moose are active. Next trip….

The outlook - a stunning view well worth the steep climb to get there.

The outlook – a stunning view well worth the steep climb to get there.

The beauty of rugged Canadian Shield country.

The beauty of rugged Canadian Shield country.

Spring is a fantastic time to visit the park because of the abundance of wildlife and the lack of visitors (it gets really busy in the southern corridor of the park, June through August). But having the park to myself came at a cost – BLACKFLIES! Yes, those pesky little biting flies with big appetites. Bug repellent is a must when visiting the park. Unfortunately, the night before I had run out of repellent while I was out walking the Spruce Bog Trail. And by the time I got back to the east gate of the park, the park office was closed and so were all the shops in nearby Whitney, where I was staying. So when I entered the park the next morning, I had no insect repellent. And the blackflies were BAD. I paid a high price for my moose photos. Three days later, my bites are still itchy. And I’d stopped counting when I discovered 30 bites on my neck and the back of my head (I didn’t bother counting how many bites I had on the rest of my body). Yes, they even work their way through your hair to bite your scalp. The blackflies were not fun. But I hadn’t come all this way to photograph moose only to be chased in by a gazillion biting flies. No. Instead, I donated blood to the local blackfly population, but left happy (and itchy) with my moose photos. Next time I’ll check my stash of bug repellent before I leave on my trip. I won’t be making this mistake again….

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Black-throated Green Warbler – Photo of the Week

This weekend I finally got out for some bird photography – way behind schedule, but life’s been a bit crazy lately and well, as they say, better late than never.

I ended up photographing one of my favourite birds – a Black-throated Green Warbler. This little guy has set up shop on the same territory for 2 years. It’s nice to have him back.

Read about and view 44th Parallel Photography’s Photo of the Week by clicking on the thumbnail below.

26 May 2013

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The Warblers Return – Photo of the Week

I’m late with the Photo of the Week – sorry! Spring is my busiest time of year. The warblers are back, the wildflowers are starting to bloom. Oh, so much to get out and photograph!

But here is this week’s Photo of the Week from 44th Parallel Photography – better late, than never. šŸ™‚ This week’s photo is of one of our beautiful little warblers that pass by on their way up to the boreal forest. I love this time of year and in late winter every year, look forward to seeing the return of these beautiful little birds.

Click on the thumbnail below to view 44th Parallel Photography’s Photo of the Week

27 April 2013

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Adventures in captive wildlife photography

Tomorrow, I’m giving a talk for our Digital Directions group of our local camera club, the Lanark County Camera Club, on the captive wildlife photography shoot I did at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre in December. You can read more about the photo-shoot by clicking HERE.

To prepare for the talk, I went back to process a few more images. Here’s one of a Canada Lynx from that shoot. I love that iconic lynx pose, those black ear tufts, and piercing eyes.

Captive lynx at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre.

Captive lynx at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre.

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Beyond fair weather photography

This week’s Photo of the Week is of a distant island on a frozen lake, in the middle of a raging blizzard. I think the conditions made for a great photo. Composition is simple, there’s no distracting colour, and the ripples of the snow on the windswept lake offer some texture. The image IS in colour, not black and white. It’s just that there wasn’t any colour – not in the white out conditions I was in.

It’s not the first time I’ve been out in a raging blizzard making images. I don’t always get the opportunity to head out in those conditions. But when I do, I enjoy it. It allows for a whole suite of completely different creative opportunities than on most of my photo outings.

A cattail marsh in the midst of a raging blizzard. The only colour was from the dead cattails in the foreground. The conditions allow for simple compositions.

A cattail marsh in the midst of a raging blizzard. The only colour was from the dead cattails in the foreground. The conditions allow for simple compositions.

The image above is memorable as I stopped at the side of a quiet rural road, about 5 km from my house. It was just a really quick stop to grab an image that caught my eye and so I left the car running, the windshield wipers on the car were on full because the snowflakes were coming down big and heavy, the heat was on full blast and I had Christmas songs blasting on the CD player. My big 600 mm lens was in the back seat…. I pulled over to the side of the road so I could safely make my image. When I do this, I usually leave the car window open or the door ajar because I don’t trust self-locking vehicles. But the snow was coming down so heavy, I couldn’t leave the window open. And hey, I was only stopping for a minute to make a photo….

I got back to the car and the doors were locked. All of them! Even though the self-locking mechanism isn’t supposed to engage while the car is running, but is not in gear, well, my car didn’t read the manual. It was locked up tighter than a drum! So here I am, a few hours before dark, on a pretty isolated road, in the middle of nowhere, in a raging blizzard. Oh, and my cell phone was sitting on the front seat, along with my jacket and mitts. Luckily I was wearing a heavy sweater, skidoo boots and the temperatures were only just below freezing. But still…..

I had a choice – break one of the windows so I could get back in my car, or start walking toward home and hope like heck someone came by so I could flag them down. I wasn’t actually worried so much about the car, even though it was running, lights were on, etc. I was more worried about my 600 mm lens, sitting in the back seat and visible. Usually I have the seat belt on her and she’s covered. But today I was in a hurry. Taking shortcuts is always a bad idea…

So, I chose to walk. Fortunately, it was only about 10 minutes when Ā car came by. They had a cell phone. So I called my husband and had him bring the spare keys. So, a note to those with a self-locking vehicle. Don’t trust it! I now drive a car with manual only locks. I like that much better.

The view on my walk to get help.

The view on my walk to get help.

So, the moral of my story is definitely go out in this crazy weather and make images. Just do it safely. Driving conditions can be hairy and well, there are crazy things like auto-locks. But those aside, have fun with the creative conditions at hand.

The colours in this birch thicket caught my eye. I liked how the blowing snow muted those colours but also created a diagonal texture to the image.

The colours in this birch thicket caught my eye. I liked how the blowing snow muted those colours but also created a diagonal texture to the image.

An old barn off the road. The fence and dead grasses in the foreground contrast with the hazy view of the barn. The blowing snow gave the image some texture.

An old barn off the road. The fence and dead grasses in the foreground contrast with the hazy view of the barn. The blowing snow gave the image some texture.

Next blizzard or foggy day, I hope you get out with your camera. Most ‘normal’ people choose to stay inside when the weather is foul. But us photographers see the creative potential and so, instead of curling by the fire, we grab our gear and hit the road.

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Filed under Abstracts, Creative Photography, Digital Photography, Landscape, Nature, nature photography, Photo of the Week, photography, Winter

Photo of the Week – White Out

Ah, it’s good to be back and working on the Photo of the Week after a brief trip out west for work. When we flew out to Edmonton it took us nearly an extra hour (of an already nearly 4 hour flight) just because the headwinds were so extraordinarily strong! Nothing like battling the jet stream….

I think those winds landed here. Today, I’m sitting at the computer wondering if the roof will lift off or that I’ll feel like I was teleported into a colourized version of the Wizard of Oz as the house gets sucked off its foundation. Sheesh!

Our noisy, windy day today compelled me to post a photo taken last year at Sharbot Lake, but it actually looked pretty similar here an hour ago.

For me, this Photo of the Week illustrates that you can make some great images in the worst of weather. Being out in 70 km per hour winds and driving snow doesn’t feel good. But it can offer some pretty impressive and interesting photographic opportunities.

Click on the thumbnail below to have a look at this week’s Photo of the Week from 44th Parallel Photography.

20 January 2013

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Spectacular! My captive wildlife photo-shoot

I received my Christmas present a bit early this year. A few days before Christmas I headed up to Muskoka Wildlife Centre near Orillia, Ontario, Canada. For me, about a four and a half hour drive away. I’d been eyeing Ontario photographer, Raymond Barlow’s captive wildlife shoot at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre for Ā several months. And well, since my hubby was going to be in New Zealand for Christmas, I figured it was time to treat myself and to get out and do something really fun for the holidays. Oh man, I was not disappointed….. (but I’m getting ahead of myself here).

RayBarlow_blogspot

Ray has an arrangement with the wildlife centre where he brings in small groups (max 6) of photographers for a special photo-shoot of some of the centre’s captive wildlife. It brings in revenue for the centre, promotes the centre, and provides (in my opinion) one of the BEST opportunities for photographing captive wildlife that we have around here.

So, I signed up, but tried not to get toooo excited about it because I didn’t want to have a preconceived notion of what it would be like, only to be disappointed by the photo opportunities. For me, this was basically an experiment. An adventure. I’d never photographed captive wildlife before. Initially I had mixed feelings about it. But hey, I’m a biologist. I know that unless I quit my day job and live like Grizzly Adams in the Canadian Rockies, that my likelihood of ever seeing a cougar in the wild, let alone photographing one, is about the same as the likelihood that I’ll win $50million in LottoMax. Actually, I think the probability of me winning the $50million is higher….

So, when you know that it might take 10 consecutive lifetimes to ever see an animal like that in the wild let alone capture it in pixels, you concede that photographing captive wildlife isn’t such a bad idea. And so, I signed up for Ray’s workshop.

Muskoka Wildlife Centre

We met at the wildlife centre at 9 am and Ray prepped us for the shoot by describing what the setting was like and what the best strategy was for getting good images. In retrospect, all excellent advice. We were then introduced to Dale Gienow, a co-founder of the wildlife centre, expert animal handler and just one heck of a nice guy (and also has the distinction of being the top jouster in Canada – go figure…). Dale gave us an introduction to the wildlife centre, why it exists and how it exists. I was surprised to learn that many of its resident animals are super-stars and that they should be signing autographed photos…. Dale routinely works asĀ Scientific Advisor for wildlife documentary films produced by BBC, National Geographic and aired on the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet. I was surprised to hear of their international reputation, but once we were in the enclosures and working with the animals, it was abundantly clear that this was a top-notch facility, where the animals are treated like royalty and their health, happiness and safety is an absolute first priority. All I can say is…. IMPRESSIVE!

Dale described how we would be photographing each of the animals for that days photo-shoot: Timber Wolves, Cougar, Silver Fox, Canada Lynx and a Saw whet Owl. All of the larger mammals live in huge, outdoor fence enclosures that contain native vegetation. For all but the cougar, we were in the enclosures with the animals. At no point was I ever concerned about my safety. It was abundantly clear that Dale and his assistant were expert animal handlers and also knew each of these animals personalities like the back of their hands. This meant that we could relax, enjoy the experience, and make the most of our photographic opportunities.

Just as we set out, it started to snow. And snow. And snow. I mean, holy cow, it snowed! Heavy, wet snow. And lighting conditions were challenging – very dark. But hey, you make the most of your situation, whatever it is. I ended up shooting primarily with my Nikon 18-200 mm lens because we were so close to most of the animals. I lugged my Nikon 600 mm bazooka with me, but only used it for photographing Lulu, the super-star Saw whet Owl. We entered the huge, fenced enclosure and when ready, Dale let out two gorgeous Timber Wolves. A male and female pair. Stunningly beautiful animals! At first I cursed the heavy snow and low light conditions. I’d forgotten my lens hood and so snowflakes kept glomming to my lens. I’d quickly try to wipe them off, but instead, smeared water all over my lens. Arrggghhh! Ā But I quickly adapted, got into a rhythm of shooting and made the most of it.

It’s funny how snowy, dull conditions that you first think are miserable shooting conditions and that you curse, quickly become some of the BEST shooting conditions you could ever imagine! Seriously! The photography was challenging. No, actually, that’s a gross understatement. This was some of the most challenging photography I’d EVER done. But oh, it was sooo much fun. I was on a high. The wolves would trot towards us in a relaxed way, pause for a few seconds, sniff around, and then trot off in another direction. All you could hear was the buzz of continuous shutter releases as we all went mad to make images. It was hard. And with the low light conditions, my shutter speed was too slow for a lot of the images and so a lot were blurry. But I was shooting with my Nikon D200 (my trusty, but way too old steed. It’s sooo time to upgrade). The only thing I don’t like about the D200 is that it’s old technology and so shooting at high ISO is not wonderful. Images can be pretty noisy, unlike the new Nikon sensors that let you shoot at high ISO and you don’t even notice a difference. Sigh…

But, you make the most of your situation and I did. When the wolves paused, I made the most of those opportunities and rattled off a lot of frames, careful to compose as best I could and ensure that the fencing was not visible in the background. Dale and his assistant were great at getting the wolves to move around so that there was lots of opportunity to photograph them with only a forest environment visible and no fence in the background. These guys were good, I mean, really good. They worked hard to help us get the good shots, but what I loved was that the animal’s welfare was always their top priority. Just the way it should be….

Female Timber Wolf at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Female Timber Wolf at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

It wasn’t till I got home and looked at my images that I saw how the slow shutter speed along with the heavy snowfall and dull light conditions made for magical shooting conditions. Have a look at my image of the female Timber Wolf, above. See how the falling snow and slow shutter speed create soft, white, vertical lines? And the dull light conditions actually created a soft feel to the images. Had I had a better camera for the shoot, I would have had a ton more images that were keepers. But I’m still happy with what I did get. And most of all, it was the experience of being in the pen with those wolves that was the real high.

Male Timber Wolf at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre.

Male Timber Wolf at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre.

Next on the photo-menu was the cougar. It’s a no-brainer to understand why we were not allowed inside the enclosure with it. Most of these animals have been hand-raised from a young age and so they are used to people. But still. This is a 150 lb cat with millions of years of evolution that have shaped its behaviour and instincts. Ā So we went inside the outer fenced enclosure, but stayed outside the inner enclosure. This meant shooting through the chain-link fence. Another challenge. But to be honest, not that big of a problem. The cougar came so close to us that my 18-200 mm zoom was all that was necessary to capture some beautiful face shots. Dale and his assistant were there to keep things safe. When the cougar walked by us on the other side of the fence, we quietly took a step back just in case. But let me tell you, to be a foot away from a cougar and to have your eyes meet his…. it’s an experience that stirs your soul. I once had a mind-meld with a wild Beluga Whale in Churchill, Manitoba. Looking into the eyes of this cougar was on the same order as that. Indescribable….

Cougar at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Cougar at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Cougar at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Cougar at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Next on our photo safari was a Canada Lynx. For this one, we were in the enclosure with the cat. And what a cat it was. Wow…. Such a beautiful animal. Dale and his assistant kept the cat at a reasonable distance from us, maybe 6 feet away. It was perfect for making some amazing images. At one point I stopped shooting just so I could admire this beautiful cat – it’s huge, snowshoe paws, those dapper, black ear tufts, and the luxurious fur. Ya, I’m a biologist and so for me, it wasn’t entirely about the photography. It was about seeing these animals up close. Animals that even the most active outdoors person is so unlikely to ever encounter.

Canada Lynx at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Canada Lynx at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Next on our safari was a Silver Fox. We photographed him in the same enclosure as the Lynx (after the Lynx had been moved to another pen) and so were able to make images of it from 6 feet away. What a gorgeous animal. And those penetrating copper eyes against the black and smokey grey of its fur….

Silver Fox at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Silver Fox at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Our final photographic subject was a beautiful little Saw whet Owl, named Lulu. Lulu is a super-star! She’s the same individual animal that was used to make the Telus Mobility TV ads. So she’s a TV star. I know I should have asked for her autograph…. Dale placed her on several different branches to provide a variety of backgrounds and perches. This is where I hauled out my 600 mm bazooka, took several steps back and began shooting. Wow! The outstanding glass on that lens sure captures the fine details of feathers.

Lulu, the Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Lulu, the Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

After we’d finished our official photo-shoot, Dale invited us to wander around the centre on our own, to photograph other animals in the outdoor pens or to come back inside to meet the skunks, opossum, Northern Bobwhite, Blanding’s Turtle, and the variety of other interesting critters housed inside.

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

All I can say is that photo-shoot was one of the BEST experiences I’d ever had. It was some of the most challenging shooting I’d ever done. But also the most satisfying. And to be honest, if I’d come away without any nice images, the entire experience still would have been worth every penny. Would I go back and do it again? You bet! In a heartbeat.

Silver Fox at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Silver Fox at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

A footnote: I was trolling through the Fine Art America website since I’m working on uploading some images to it for selling. Out of curiosity, I searched for images of wolves, cougars, foxes and the like. I have to say that I was appalled to see that only a few photographers actually listed their images as being those of CAPTIVE wildlife. In fact, the only ones who specified that theirs were images of captive wildlife were the professionals – people who are internationally renowned. The rest didn’t give it a mention. And I swear that one person had images that were also made at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre. Maybe I’m wrong, but the backgrounds looked awfully familiar….. My point here is that as photographers, I think we MUST be honest. I’m a biologist and so I know that most images of wolves, cougars and similar wildlife are of captive animals. Frankly, you can pretty much tell by the kind of image. Anything close up is captive. There were images by Paul Nicklen – images of Lynx and other wildlife that you know are authentic, that you know are of wild animals. But the rest….. come on guys… come clean. There’s an ethical issue here. If it’s an image of a captive animal, say so. Don’t try to pull the wool over the eyes of someone who doesn’t have the knowledge to know that the chances of photographing a cougar, close-up, in the wild are next to nil. Ā And I don’t buy the excuse that they didn’t say they were wild. The omission of the word captive still makes you guilty in my mind. Let’s call a spade a spade….

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Bottom line – this was an absolutely fantastic photographic experience on all fronts and I wouldn’t hesitant a second to recommend it. In fact, I hope I’m going back. Maybe in the fall, at the height of the fall colours and hopefully by then, with a better camera for the job….

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

Saw whet Owl at the Muskoka Wildlife Centre

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